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  • published the article Burn Baby Burn - Titanfall's Burn Cards Change the Game

    Titanfall, the new first person shooter from Respawn Entertainment, exploded onto the scene in a ball of frenzied battles and intense speculation from the moment it was announced, with leaked footage and details garnering massive interest from both the hardcore FPS community and the average gamer. Titanfall is a game with a particular fanbase and skillset on tap, and due to the pedigree of its creators, it’s no surprise that the game itself is rife with battle perks, upgrades, and game changing weapon modifications.

    Perhaps the most interesting of these is the wonderful new Burn Card system, a deck of cards that are earned through various achievements (a list of which can be found on our Official Titanfall Wiki). Though the card abilities themselves seem overpowered - calling a Titan in immediately, arming yourself with a rapid fire grenade launcher, running almost twice as fast as the other pilots - the cards are single use only, lasting from spawn to death, balancing their incredible benefits with a limited time of effectiveness.Smart use of the Burn Card you’ve chosen is integral to success on the battlefield - you can only choose three at the start of a match, and once they’re chosen, you’re stuck with that round until the next change.

    Picking the right set though, and even more specifically the right card at the right time, can shift a battle in your favor. Coordinated use in the team can result in a situation where you are overpowered by various Titans metamorphosing into a situation where you now have two Pilots wielding automatic grenade launchers and a set of Titans dropping directly into the fray. The cards are a wonderful addition to be sure, and they have been intricately and meticulously balanced to make sure it doesn’t ruin the game flow. Titanfall is a game all about balance, and it shows through this system: a great, complicated, wonderful system that can change the battlefield, but only if it’s used correctly.

    Titanfall is set to release on March 11th, so in the meantime, you should come check out our Official Titanfall Wiki! Make sure to check out the front page often as new information is released, and also be sure to peruse the official Gamepedia Youtube channel, where there's a wide breadth of content for Titanfall and other games in the Curse Gamepedia wiki family!

     

    Posted in: Burn Baby Burn - Titanfall's Burn Cards Change the Game
  • published the article Hands-on With Titanfall

    We started the play test with a tutorial level. The thing that fascinated me about it was the pure fluidity of the controls; while the art of free-running known as parkour has been done before in various other titles, it has almost always been done either with little direct interaction from the player or with too many fiddly inputs and key combinations, almost always resulting in wonky and uncoordinated movements that long relegated the concept to the land of gimmickry. This isn't so with Titanfall - the controls are ridiculously tight and fluid, with each jump and twist feeling more visceral than ever before. It feels as if your character is an extension of you, moving smooth enough to grant fine control of motion and movement; running along walls, double jumping, and chaining air jumps with wall run acrobatics became almost second nature by the time I was done with the level. During one of my breaks, I joined in a conversation with Abbie Heppe, the Respawn Community Manager who I would later interview, and she put it best - "People need to get used to it I think, but once they get it, they love it. People say they try doing it in other games after they do it here!"

    Titanfall currently has three confirmed game modes, and between them - Last Titan Standing, Hardpoint, and Attrition - the game is broad and varied in focus, feel, and gameplay. Hardpoint ended dramatically for my team. Our assured victory started its slow descent into defeat about three quarters through the match, when our best Titan pilot was caught in a pincer attack between two enemy Titans. Though his nuclear meltdown meant at least one of the enemy Titans was damaged beyond repair, the other Titan managed to keep ground control relatively secure, and we were slowly pushed pack to point Bravo, which we lost during a surge of ground activity. As the game ended, we were urged to get to the dropship in the distance, and as a large group, we started to sprint towards our salvation. It was only as the dropship exploded and the last salvos emptied that I realized we had evacuated on top of an apartment building; for the first time, the scope of the city hit me, and I realized just how large this world was.

    "The world of Titanfall is one that's at the edges of the universe, where people journey to build lives, and it's more like getting to the west after traversing the Oregon Trail, but in space." Heppe explained. "We want people to see Titanfall and say, 'this is a bed, this a home'; we want it to be something that is very familiar, but at the same time, you're looking around and saying 'Oh my God, we're in space!'." The aim is certainly familiar - games like Battlefield  and Rogue Squadron have long tried to make the world feel truly massive and intricate, to various rates of success. Titanfall has treated this backdrop almost as a fine art, sculpting each element with precision and allowing it to flow organically into the game.

    It all works because it was designed to, because it was planned and executed with the entirety of the game in mind. When asked if these designs, choices, and structures in gameplay were as intentional as I suspected they were, Heppe confirmed my suspicions. "We try to explain to people the reason why we do things, and the reason things are the way they are; a lot of people who are asking for things haven't played the game, so us doing the beta and getting the game out there for people to play and figure these things out for themselves is super important." One of the many things I told Heppe during our conversations was that the game feels like it was designed by fans - it seems like every member of the Titanfall team is truly a fan of the game they are making, not just employees of a company that is happening to make a game. That's not to say the game is entirely uni-directional or single-faceted; the game is as varied as the gameplay, and in a funny turn, this variation was due to the level of attention dealt by the developers. "Originally, there was this work on...power armor and stuff that was not really titans, so there is definitely a lot of those things [that] came along as the game was developing towards a Titan-based game...there were a lot of concepts early on."

    The interaction is not just one-sided, though; Heppe made it clear that the community had a significant role in development as well. "We are always listening to [the community]. It's very rare that somebody is saying something about Titanfall on the internet, on twitter, on everything, and we're not aware of it." Heppe smiles, obviously excited. "For us, we're building this foundation that is Titanfall, so there's a lot of things that we found interesting, or we incorporated, or added later, but this is the game we're making." Heppe made it clear, however, that the game had not fallen into the "vocal minority" trappings as so many other crowd-influenced games have. "We hear all of that stuff, and some of it is stuff for a future date, and some of it is stuff that would horribly unbalance the game if we did it. I think you'll remember when we were clarifying, 'yeah, this is a 6v6 game'; it's not that we haven't tested it 10v10 or higher numbers, it's that the game wasn't fun when we did that, and we need to make decisions that make it a fun game for everyone playing it.”

    Of course, this experience is what makes a first-person shooter a success, and support for competitive play has been heavily balanced with the regular play experience. "We've tried to build a foundation for a fun game that is going to be awesome to play," Heppe continues, "We're not going to be shipping with all the same features to support [competitive play] that games that have been around for however many iterations, almost a decade I think for some of them, have, but I know that there's so much interest from the eSports community competitively and we’re definitely interested in what they have to say. We can't build the whole game for them; we have to build an awesome game and hope that they enjoy that and are interested in picking it up and playing it, and carrying on Titanfall for the next few months or years. I think at launch it's going to be interesting to hear their feedback." That feedback is of prime importance to Titanfall's success in certain parts of the world. Case in point, there was a lot of legitimate fears amongst Australian gamers that the lack of local Azure servers, the servers that will be hosting online games, would result in an unplayable hundreds-large millisecond ping. Heppe assuages some of those fears, stating "Microsoft is building Azure servers in Australia...and they'll be going online later this year. In the meantime, we have been testing the game in Australia to make sure they won't get super ridiculous milliseconds lag. [...] Obviously we don't want anyone to have a bad experience playing Titanfall, and I'm really excited that Microsoft is building data centers to support them; I know that there's a huge community of Australian gamers, and I know we had said at E3 last year that we thought they'd be there by now - they're not, but we're doing everything we can to make sure they get a good experience too." It's a common sentiment amongst EA and Respawn; the community is incredibly important, and they want the experience itself to be fun before anything else.

    And as for the most common query for Respawn? "We get asked the number [of maps] all the time, and realistically, we want players to just go in and discover a lot of things about Titanfall for themselves, and the number of maps is one of those things. There are a lot, and they are very varied, even compared to what we're showing you today. Fractured has a lot of open spaces, and Angel City has a lot more vertical flanking and jumping off of buildings and sort of weaving in and out of these passageways. There are maps that are higher, there are maps that are totally different." Heppe laughs and smiles. "We haven't even shown one of my favorite ones yet!"

     

    Posted in: Hands-on With Titanfall
  • published the article The Official Dungeonforge Wiki is Live!

    If games like Baldur's Gate claim inspiration from the classic Dungeons & Dragons style, Dungeonforge is clearly redefining it - with a massive, open world, and a fully featured game editor to accompany it, Dungeonforge places you in the hot-seat as the dungeon master, allowing you to drive and shape the game as you tell your unique story. Curse is proud to present the Official Dungeonforge Wiki, a partnership between The Collective Dream Studios and Gamepedia that's sure to inspire a few epic journeys. This game is currently in the midst of a Kickstarter campaign, so if you're excited to try it out, consider dropping by and pledging your support!


    Dungeonforge is, at its heart, a community driven affair; while first party content is included in the base game, third-party content is the real driving force behind the game. The development of community resources is so important, in fact, that a token system is being developed for the game, allowing you to "tip" content creators with tokens redeemable for real world cash!

    Perhaps the most interesting part of Dungeonforge is the titular editor; equipped with the ability to edit large outdoors areas, build complex and winding dungeons, script quests and NPC interactions, and so much more, the Dungeonforge editor is extremely complex and unique, lending the dungeonmaster all the tools he or she would need to create epic, twisting journeys into the dark abyss.

    So what are you waiting for? Jump into Dungeonforge today by visting our wiki, and while you're at it, drop by The Collective Dream Studios! See you in the overworld!

    Posted in: The Official Dungeonforge Wiki is Live!
  • published the article Our Titanfall Wiki is Now Official!

    Here at Gamepedia, our principal focus has always been on delivering the best content we possibly could to as many gamers as we could reach, enriching both the gameplay experience and the personal knowledge of fans of a variety of genres and titles. To this end, we have endeavored to bring you the most up to date data, walkthroughs, and news for all of your favorite titles, and have reached out to many developers in a bid to gain “Official Status”. This coveted state, “Official Status”, has permitted us to form a conduit of official data, character models, item descriptions, level details, and more, allowing our various Official Wikis to function as both a community for the players and a direct information pipeline to the Developer. Becoming an “Official Wiki” means better content, a larger breadth of coverage, and increased presence, allowing more gamers to find and utilize our hard-developed resources and contribute their own to our growing network of Wikis.

    In this spirit, Gamepedia and Curse are proud to announce that we have reached an agreement with the developer and publisher of Titanfall, Respawn Entertainment and Electronic Arts, to make our wiki the Official Titanfall Wiki! Continuing in our long line of successful official partnerships, Titanfall on Gamepedia will provide fans and viewers a direct link to the developers, providing fresh content available on no other site. As interest grows and the title nears release, additional information, contests, and giveaways sponsored by EA will come into full swing, allowing the Wiki and its community to thrive and grow exponentially.

    Not too long ago, we launched a massive editing contest for Titanfall, offering an Xbox One Console and a copy of Titanfall to the top editor (with three copies of Titanfall for the next runners-up); this contest was a massive and unprecedented success, with an outstanding outpouring of support and community effort seldom seen anywhere else but Gamepedia. Thousands of edits, made across hundreds of pages, are partly to thank for our Official Status, and we would like to take this opportunity to express our deepest gratitude to our wonderful community. Good job everyone!

    As our partnership enters full swing, Titanfall on Gamepedia will begin a new transformation in content, style, and format; expect huge changes in the coming weeks, culminating in the most up-to-date and complete information available on the net, delivered daily and available nowhere else. We look forward to seeing all of you on our Official Titanfall Wiki, and thank you for your contributions and efforts!

    Posted in: Our Titanfall Wiki is Now Official!
  • published the article BlizzCon 2013 Recap - Expansions, Patches, and a New Direction

    As the excitement for BlizzCon 2013 mounted to a fever pitch, a single sentiment seemed to ring for fans and journalists alike - BlizzCon just wouldn't be BlizzCon without some sort of groundbreaking revelation, gigantic expansion, or massive launch. In previous years, huge expansions to popular franchises, complete sequels, and total overhauls of core game mechanics have all been announced at BlizzCon; with the backlash for Diablo III's auction house, falling subscriber numbers for World of Warcraft, and the rumored cancelation of Project Titan, BlizzCon 2013 was set to be a "make it or break it" convention. The short story? Blizzard made it, and they made it big.

     

    World of Warcraft - New Expansion, Revamped System

    Blizzard's flagship title, World of Warcraft, has been and likely will be for the foreseeable future a juggernaut in the MMO genre. That being said, subscriber numbers have been falling, with many fearing that the World of Warcraft was not as untouchable as once thought. Any fears were put to rest during the keynote speech from Mike Morhaime, when the new expansion for World of Warcraft, Warlords of Draenor, was announced. The title, a modern harkening back to pre-Cataclysm style World of Warcraft, features elements of time travel, and brings a long-desired level cap increase to level 100. As part of this new expansion, the world of Draenor, home of the Orc and Draenei races, has been rendered truly and beautifully, featuring much of the iconic art that so defines the staple races of the Horde.

     

    Most spectacularly, Blizzard has included a new Garrison system in the next expansion, where you can construct a customizable stronghold, gathering NPCs to populate and curate it while you are away adventuring. Introduces alongside this new system, and to almost as loud an applause, is a batch of new character models for all races and characters. The changes, which were likely made to match the darker tone of Warlords, were greeted with great fanfare. Look for these changes soon at our World of Warcraft mega-wiki, Wowpedia.

     

    Blizzard apologies for Diablo III's Auction House

    For those who are more "dungeon crawling" than "instance raiding", Diablo III had some great news: "Two months ago we announced we were getting rid of the auction house," - and with that statement from Michael Morhaime, the crowd erupted into a loud frenzy. "We're going to make it right, and we're not going to stop there." The Auction House, a controversial inclusion into the already controversial Diablo III, allowed players to sell in-game items for cold hard cash, a move that many felt made Diablo III a "pay to win" game. While it was often chastised for that particular negative, the feature was also likely responsible for the always-on DRM that crippled launch day copies of the game and became an internet meme of its own. Blizzard's announcement that the Auction House is dead is not only reassuring to the gamers, it is downright wonderful to the community, a community that Blizzard is famous for taking care of and loving that has been feeling more and more neglected. Check out our Diablo Wiki for more information.

     

    Heroes of the Storm Whips Up a Storm of Excitement

    When Blizzard let the rights to DOTA slip over to Valve, resulting in the creation of DOTA2 in 2010, many thought Blizzard would be announcing their own MOBA in short order. While that didn't happen during BlizzCon 2011 or 2012, Blizzard showcased Heroes of the Storm this year to the excited crowds of the convention hall. Positioning the title as a "Hero Brawler", game director Dustin Browder stated the game was inspired by BlizzCon itself. "When we came to BlizzCon, we were inspired by the art hanging on the walls, by the banners showing these characters together," Browder said, implying the game is as much inspired by community as by personal interests. "When we had the chance to make one of these games our own, we just couldn't resist."

     

    While many believe DotA2 to be too firmly entrenched to be overthrown, many fans suggested that having what amounts to a Battle Royale with our favorite characters from Blizzard lore more than makes up for that lost head start. Considering fan reactions during the cinematic, which featured Arthas from Warcraft III, Nova from StarCraft: Ghost, and Jim Raynor himself, that may not be too far from the truth. Gamepedia is the leading resource for all Heroes of the Storm info via our Heroes of the Storm Wiki.

     

    The Bottom Line

    Blizzard has always been first and foremost about the community, and this BlizzCon showcases that dedication the best - responding to the desires of the fans and the dislikes of their critics, Blizzard has now positioned themselves in a new path of development for their flagship title, has firmly injected themselves into the MOBA arena, and is rectifying past mistakes and improving a game that has already been released, something that is far too rare these days. Blizzard hit a home run this BlizzCon, and with the conclusion of Day One, hopes run high for Day Two of one of the greatest conventions of all time.

     

    Posted in: BlizzCon 2013 Recap - Expansions, Patches, and a New Direction
  • published the article Blizzcon Day One Recap

    As the excitement for BlizzCon 2013 mounted to a fever pitch, a single sentiment seemed to ring for fans and journalists alike - BlizzCon just wouldn't be BlizzCon without some sort of groundbreaking revelation, gigantic expansion, or massive launch. In previous years, huge expansions to popular franchises, complete sequels, and total overhauls of core game mechanics have all been announced at BlizzCon; with the backlash for Diablo III's auction house, falling subscriber numbers for World of Warcraft, and the rumored cancelation of Project Titan, BlizzCon 2013 was set to be a "make it or break it" convention. The short story? Blizzard made it, and they made it big.

     

    World of Warcraft - New Expansion, Revamped System

    Blizzard's flagship title, World of Warcraft, has been and likely will be for the foreseeable future a juggernaut in the MMO genre. That being said, subscriber numbers have been falling, with many fearing that the World of Warcraft was not as untouchable as once thought. Any fears were put to rest during the keynote speech from Mike Morhaime, when the new expansion for World of Warcraft, Warlords of Draenor, was announced. The title, a modern harkening back to pre-Cataclysm style World of Warcraft, features elements of time travel, and brings a long-desired level cap increase to level 100. As part of this new expansion, the world of Draenor, home of the Orc and Draenei races, has been rendered truly and beautifully, featuring much of the iconic art that so defines the staple races of the Horde.

     

    Most spectacularly, Blizzard has included a new Garrison system in the next expansion, where you can construct a customizable stronghold, gathering NPCs to populate and curate it while you are away adventuring. Introduces alongside this new system, and to almost as loud an applause, is a batch of new character models for all races and characters. The changes, which were likely made to match the darker tone of Warlords, were greeted with great fanfare. Look for these changes soon at our World of Warcraft mega-wiki, Wowpedia.

     

    Blizzard apologies for Diablo III's Auction House

    For those who are more "dungeon crawling" than "instance raiding", Diablo III had some great news: "Two months ago we announced we were getting rid of the auction house," - and with that statement from Michael Morhaime, the crowd erupted into a loud frenzy. "We're going to make it right, and we're not going to stop there." The Auction House, a controversial inclusion into the already controversial Diablo III, allowed players to sell in-game items for cold hard cash, a move that many felt made Diablo III a "pay to win" game. While it was often chastised for that particular negative, the feature was also likely responsible for the always-on DRM that crippled launch day copies of the game and became an internet meme of its own. Blizzard's announcement that the Auction House is dead is not only reassuring to the gamers, it is downright wonderful to the community, a community that Blizzard is famous for taking care of and loving that has been feeling more and more neglected. Check out our Diablo Wiki for more information.

     

    Heroes of the Storm Whips Up a Storm of Excitement

    When Blizzard let the rights to DOTA slip over to Valve, resulting in the creation of DOTA2 in 2010, many thought Blizzard would be announcing their own MOBA in short order. While that didn't happen during BlizzCon 2011 or 2012, Blizzard showcased Heroes of the Storm this year to the excited crowds of the convention hall. Positioning the title as a "Hero Brawler", game director Dustin Browder stated the game was inspired by BlizzCon itself. "When we came to BlizzCon, we were inspired by the art hanging on the walls, by the banners showing these characters together," Browder said, implying the game is as much inspired by community as by personal interests. "When we had the chance to make one of these games our own, we just couldn't resist."

     

    While many believe DotA2 to be too firmly entrenched to be overthrown, many fans suggested that having what amounts to a Battle Royale with our favorite characters from Blizzard lore more than makes up for that lost head start. Considering fan reactions during the cinematic, which featured Arthas from Warcraft III, Nova from StarCraft: Ghost, and Jim Raynor himself, that may not be too far from the truth. Gamepedia is the leading resource for all Heroes of the Storm info via our Heroes of the Storm Wiki.

     

    The Bottom Line

    Blizzard has always been first and foremost about the community, and this BlizzCon showcases that dedication the best - responding to the desires of the fans and the dislikes of their critics, Blizzard has now positioned themselves in a new path of development for their flagship title, has firmly injected themselves into the MOBA arena, and is rectifying past mistakes and improving a game that has already been released, something that is far too rare these days. Blizzard hit a home run this BlizzCon, and with the conclusion of Day One, hopes run high for Day Two of one of the greatest conventions of all time.

     

    Posted in: Blizzcon Day One Recap
  • published the article Second Chance Heroes Prepares for Beta Weekend #3

     

    Second Chance Heroes has announced this coming weekend, July 6th-7th, as the third in their series of beta Weekends. Starting at 10:00 am on Saturday and ending 10:00 pm on Sunday, Applicants and testers who have been selected for the test will be notified by email throughout the week. If you are interested in being a part of this Beta test, volunteers can use the beta portal at https://www.2ndchanceheroes.com/beta to apply.

    For previous testers, this Beta will pick up from the last one; progress and items will be saved. Two new levels have been added to underground Hobo Colony, a new character will join the current six, and new relics have been added for discovery. In addition to bug fixes and improvements, several unannounced features are planned for reveal.

    A client will be available to chosen testers later this week through the My Account page. The Steam Greenlight page for Second Chance Heroes can be found at http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=146770056.

    Posted in: Second Chance Heroes Prepares for Beta Weekend #3
  • published the article Welcome to the new, improved, and expanded Gamepedia.com!

    At Curse, our goal is to elevate your game through the cultivation of communities driven by dedication. From the smallest free-to-play browser based simulation games to large million-user mmorpgs, we seek to engage, inform, and entertain through our wikis, articles, and media; to that end, we have completely redesigned the front page using input from community members and staff across the board, giving you streamlined access to all your favorite and most important resources. Instead of a bank of text links to wikis, we have now streamlined the category selection process, allowing quicker access to a wide variety of resources. Additionally, a new community spotlight feature will highlight the most popular wikis on the front page, representing the efforts of our most dedicated wiki communities. We find this new design a natural evolution of the Gamepedia platform, and hope you find it as wonderful as we do.

    As the Gamepedia platform evolves, so does the needs of the average gamer; with this in mind, we are proud to announce full mobile access support on Gamepedia.com! In the past few weeks, Gamepedia staff have been quietly adding mobile frontends and custom css to their wikis, creating secondary mobile sites that launch automatically for mobile users, cutting down on data transfer and creating a faster, smoother interface for mobile operating systems. This system is automatic – mobile phones, tablets, and even small-form notebooks will now automatically access the mobile versions of sites, getting you the content you need now at a fraction of the time!

    We at Curse are fully aware that without you, the gamers, we would be nothing, and we hope that you are as overjoyed and excited with our new architecture as we are. We look forward to meeting your high expectations and continuing to grow and match the needs of the gaming community. Thank you all for your support, and as always, happy gaming!

    Posted in: Welcome to the new, improved, and expanded Gamepedia.com!
  • published the article Gamepedia Hosts Official Wiki of The Castle Doctrine

     

    Curse is proud to announce our newest addition to the Gamepedia platform, The Castle Doctrine Wiki. Focusing primarily on strategy both as the criminal and the defender, The Castle Doctrine is a massively multiplayer online game centering around burglary and home defense.

    Players can use their limited budget to construct labyrinthine home defense systems replete with steel walls, trap door, and hidden pits; likewise, criminals can purchase burglary tools to assist in their crimes, ripping walls apart with explosives and picking doors with high precision picks.

    If you are a fan of The Castle Doctrine or of MMO strategy games, head on over to the official wiki at http://thecastledoctrine.gamepedia.com. As a platform, Gamepedia would be nothing without the players and their unique strategies, experiences, and knowledge, so if you think you have a great new strategy, a hidden gem, or just want to hang out with fellow players, we urge you to take a look at the wiki. As always, enjoy the game!

    Posted in: Gamepedia Hosts Official Wiki of The Castle Doctrine